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Maintenance tech tip

Selecting Sprockets for Gearbox Design

Good practice is to always have your smallest sprocket with 19 teeth or more to reduce wear rates (Use odd numbered teeth if possible as it allows the chain to run better over the sprocket).

Mike Sondalini

www.lifetime-reliability.com

 

Automatic Lubricator

This reader having designed an automated lubricator that sprays a constant mist instead of typical drops, has a maintenance tip for us.

Most equipment has an existing plc which this lubrication unit could be interfaced with or a suitable control circuit can be built. This would solve many existing real world obstacles to properly lubricating machinery that use compressed air.

 

The reader highlights some of the major obstacles ...

Lubricators are often behind panels that seldom are opened. Lubricators are seldom "set" to the proper drip rate. It can take over 1/2 hour hour to adjust properly manually due to different machine use, cyclic nature and dwell time. Sometimes the lubricators are filled, turned turned off for various reasons.

 

With automatic lubricators interfaced to PLC, proper control can be obtained quickly, be consistent and PLC can warn plant personnel when not operating properly.

 

Thanks Bruce of www.autolubricator.com

 

Oil and Wear Particle Analysis

 

Both Oil and Wear Particle Analysis have the distinction of being able to detect oncoming problems before any damage occurs. Early warning signs of abnormalities will show up in oil long before the equipment heats up or starts to vibrate.

 

To learn more visit ...

Lubrication-FluidPower.com

 

PLC Discussion Forum

 

I started up a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) Forum. Please stop by and help me out with a post of your own. PLC Discussion Forum

Also please see "PLC Trainer (equipment)"
"On-Line PLC/SCADA Course"

 

Thanks, Don

 

Control System Design and Layout

 

Put a line filter in line with the 110v control voltage for PLCs. To read more control system and layout tips, see our maintenance and engineering articles article area.

 

Reader Feedback
Subject: Downtime related to market and supplier limitations.
Dear sir,

How do you consider equipment downtime due to market limitations in downstream or supplier limitation in upstream?

Sanjeev, Senior Manager - Corporate Quality

__________________

Dear Sanjeev:

Those who read my works know I am a big advocate of asset utilization (bottom line) focus as opposed to those who's primary focus is production schedule (operating efficiency).

With the above in mind, my opinion if market limitation can not be resolved by putting more into sales (product competitiveness and marketing) then capital assets should be adjusted accordingly. Either way reducing downtime due to market limitations.

As for supplier limitations, in most cases, it is possible to obtain zero downtime due to lack of supply. Many lessons can be learned from JIT management who require their suppliers to be JIT also (Like the big three automotive manufacturers).

On a final note, even piece work manufacturers like machining operations should strive for zero downtime on each machine. If you have a machine down because you can not find enough customers to keep production demand up, you have a machine not giving you the full return on the capital investment. (Think diversification, outsourcing and out of the box. :>)


Kudos:

Just a quick feedback on the site... Excellent. Easily navigated and very informative. Covers many of the issues I face in my working life. Had an informative and enjoyable visit. Thanks

Mark (Engineering Manager of a Packaging Plant)

__________________

Thanks for free subscription to such great newsletter. I really was looking for such situation. And I've read the volume 13. It was good.

Sepideh (Senior of Industrial Engineering)

Thank you Mark and Sepideh, your comments inspire us to keep the newsletters going. :>)

Featured Articles :

OEE Analysis at Toyota Motor Manufacturing - Reader Responds

The True Cost of Downtime - By Don Fitchett

The Japanese Path to Maintenance Excellence - By Mike Sondalini


Featured Technical Writings:

Maintenance Control from Zero to Hero

Control System Design and Layout Tips

Equipment maintenance - A second chance


 

World Industry News:

ARCwire for the Week Ending June 10,2005, reaching over 60,000 professionals worldwide.


Archives ...

Up
Vol-14, Lubrication Engineer
Vol 13 - Power Management
Vol-12, Change Management
Vol 10 -Electrical Troubleshooting
Vol-9, PLC Training
Vol-8, Six Sigma
Vol-7, Safety and Reliability
Vol-6 Reliability
Vol-5 Criticality
Vol-4, Human Resources
Vol-3, PLC Programs
Vol-2, managing people
Vol- 1, maintenance advice

Click Newsletter to return to current news letter.

 

Up ] Next ]

Volume 14:

Welcome: 

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

Topic: Lubrication and PLCs

Welcome to the 14th issue of our Feed Forward Newsletter; "The Maintenance War Newsletter". This first area of the newsletter is for introductions and commentary. Remember,  the website has many new items added each month. So please browse around and find yourself quality maintenance and engineering information. 

Online version at  www.feedforward.com.au

bearing lubrication simulation software

In line with the theme of this issue, we are giving away a free Bearing Lubrication Simulation Software CD with any CD order for the entire month of July. (Limit one free CD per customer.)

We will also have 5 drawings for a free "Pocket Maintenance Advisor - hard copy" at the end of July. To qualify you need only make a purchase during the month of July.

maintenance reference book

Watch our site in July, as several new books will be released and also three new troubleshooting CBTs that are not only educational, but a lot of fun. (If you love to troubleshoot as  I do.:>)


I would also like to take this opportunity to tell you about the new 'Kaizen Corner' area of a website by Author - Larry Bush

www.reliability-consultant.com/Kaizen_Corner.htm

My personal favorite out of the 8 Kaizen listed so far, is the one titled "THE NON-WRAPPING STRETCH WRAP MACHINE" . What an excellent example of not only the cost of not updating your PLC equipment, but also the cost of not training your people on the PLC equipment. Working with a PLC without really understanding what you are doing can cost much downtime. Also typical, the failure occurs on an off shift, when the OEM is not available. (What really hurts is when you find support is even more difficult to find because the OEM for the outdated equipment, is out of business.)

Yes, another example too, the value of performing a plant wide PLC assessment of your equipment. You can download this PLC assessment - free spreadsheet we use to collect vital info on the PLCs in a facility. (So why not take pro-active action today!)


Management HelpOEE is a Benchmark tool

One reader asks: "We have tube making lines running 24hrs a day, 5 days a week."

We work our OEE out by the simple formula
(Best Practical Speed per minutes) x 60min x 24hrs x 5days.

If we run nonstop at best speed all week (unlikely) then we get 100% OEE

But we find that several factors impinge on our formula:-

1) Different jobs run at different speeds
2) Sometimes a line is planned to be off for a day

To keep things simple we continue to use our OEE formula but I do wonder if we should be varying the parameters such as best line speed and actual running days. The issue is with several lines this gets very difficult to track. Any thoughts that might help. Regards, Dean"

Hi Dean:

Your answer is definitely, 'Yes'. The primary purpose of OEE is to be a Benchmark tool to compare Apples to Oranges. :>) Now the above is a general answer, to do the best you can, my answer would provide a little more detail. :>)

The secondary goal of using OEE to is to drive one to get the most value out of company equipment/facility as one can. To better reach this goal, some of the fortune 500 companies have developed a second benchmarking measurement tool daubed, 'TEEP'.

Please see http://www.downtimecentral.com/oee_teep.htm  for more detail.

If you have the same equipment running different products which each product runs at different speed, you want to use OEE to show you what is your most profitable product. (IE: if equipment is designed to run 30 pieces per minute, and one product requires you to slow equipment to 15 pieces per minute to maintain quality, that product process needs analyzed to improve speed.)

As a side note, maybe after much study, the speed for the slower product could not be improved. Then that lower OEE may be a consideration when pricing that more costly to produce product.

Where TEEP comes into play is that it uses scheduled production time not 24/7.

I noticed you did not mention quality in your original question, but you being Six sigma, I am sure you intended that quality being used in the OEE was assumed. :>)

So in summary, I would recommend both OEE (24/7) for equipment utilization (ROA) and TEEP for weekly benchmark (setting speed factor by product) for operating efficiency.

My Quote "Nobody runs 100% OEE, because nobody is perfect. There is always room for improvement."

Also see OEE analysis for more insight and read "What is the True Downtime Cost (TDC)?" or download the book.

Hope this helps


Human Resource:

What are SOP's, Procedures and Work Instructions?

 Reader Kon S. ask "What are the differences between SOP's, Procedures and Work Instructions?"

Don's Reply:

SOP's are Standard Operating Procedures. Which are procedures (written work instructions) that all follow to give more consistency and control to the process.

Kon elaborates...

"I have seen companies call there documentation work instructions, other companies call them procedures and other companies call them SOP's."

Don further replies ...

I believe I will stick with my first opinion. They are all basically the same and left up to the interpretation of the one's requesting them to be written.

In many cases, "work instructions" may be just a 'How to' with less focus on standardization by the author. A less formal version of the SOP. The use of just the word "procedures" being somewhere in the middle, with "SOP" being the most detailed version with the most focus on standardization.

You will probably find the more formal (and descriptive) terminology "SOP" used more in cases where ISO certification and Corporate guidelines are involved.

Hope this helps

Don

Employee Training and Development with SOP

Employee Training and Development with SOP eBook By Mike Sondalini - Discover how to realize and release the continuous improvement power of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP).


The World Wide Web:

You can pick up the news paper or a trade magazine and read the front page news or cover story of what that establishment feels is a hot topic. The truth is you may get an impression of what is a hot topic in our industry, but in actually, the topic decision was biased, paid for, or just one editor's opinion. 

The internet has some excellent tools for finding out what is truly the hot topic of focus for our industry, and it will be completely unbiased. Take for example Overture's "What's most search for" tool. Below are fairly new topics that are being most searched for by individuals from around the world in our industry. You might find them informative and interesting.

shanghai automotive industry corp

automotive closing general motor plant

industrial air compressor

And it is always interesting to know what topic (relevant to our industry) is the 'most search for' in the basic categories of industrial, engineering and maintenance. This gives you a sense of what relevant topic mater has the most internet presence. (law of supply and demand.)

Overture Google
 36275  industrial supply
 14788  industrial equipment
 11346  telegraph service commercial industrial
 21.2mil  industrial design
 19 mil  industrial engineering
 11346  industrial alliance
23004  engineering services
 21276  civil engineering
 19932  mechanical engineering
22.4 mil  engineering companies
 15 mil  engineering projects
 11.8 mil  engineering council
 14793  maintenance software
 12174  maintenance management
 10479  aircraft maintenance
 21.7 mil  maintenance management
 19.1 mil  maintenance software
 14.2 mil  maintenance manager

Best regards and thanks for being a subscriber to this newsletter,

Don Fitchett
Managing Editor
Feed Forward Publications
http://www.feedforward.com.au
Tel : (573) 547-5630

www.feedforward.com.au teaches your maintenance crew engineering and asset care knowledge so that they can solve more problems, become more knowledgeable, make better decisions and your plant runs more reliably!

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

"The War on Maintenance" newsletter is listed at Mega-Zine (Engineering Ezines)

Volume 14:

Welcome: 

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

Topic: Lubrication and PLCs

Welcome to the 14th issue of our Feed Forward Newsletter; "The Maintenance War Newsletter". This first area of the newsletter is for introductions and commentary. Remember,  the website has many new items added each month. So please browse around and find yourself quality maintenance and engineering information. 

Online version at  www.feedforward.com.au

bearing lubrication simulation software

In line with the theme of this issue, we are giving away a free Bearing Lubrication Simulation Software CD with any CD order for the entire month of July. (Limit one free CD per customer.)

We will also have 5 drawings for a free "Pocket Maintenance Advisor - hard copy" at the end of July. To qualify you need only make a purchase during the month of July.

maintenance reference book

Watch our site in July, as several new books will be released and also three new troubleshooting CBTs that are not only educational, but a lot of fun. (If you love to troubleshoot as  I do.:>)


I would also like to take this opportunity to tell you about the new 'Kaizen Corner' area of a website by Author - Larry Bush

www.reliability-consultant.com/Kaizen_Corner.htm

My personal favorite out of the 8 Kaizen listed so far, is the one titled "THE NON-WRAPPING STRETCH WRAP MACHINE" . What an excellent example of not only the cost of not updating your PLC equipment, but also the cost of not training your people on the PLC equipment. Working with a PLC without really understanding what you are doing can cost much downtime. Also typical, the failure occurs on an off shift, when the OEM is not available. (What really hurts is when you find support is even more difficult to find because the OEM for the outdated equipment, is out of business.)

Yes, another example too, the value of performing a plant wide PLC assessment of your equipment. You can download this PLC assessment - free spreadsheet we use to collect vital info on the PLCs in a facility. (So why not take pro-active action today!)


Management HelpOEE is a Benchmark tool

One reader asks: "We have tube making lines running 24hrs a day, 5 days a week."

We work our OEE out by the simple formula
(Best Practical Speed per minutes) x 60min x 24hrs x 5days.

If we run nonstop at best speed all week (unlikely) then we get 100% OEE

But we find that several factors impinge on our formula:-

1) Different jobs run at different speeds
2) Sometimes a line is planned to be off for a day

To keep things simple we continue to use our OEE formula but I do wonder if we should be varying the parameters such as best line speed and actual running days. The issue is with several lines this gets very difficult to track. Any thoughts that might help. Regards, Dean"

Hi Dean:

Your answer is definitely, 'Yes'. The primary purpose of OEE is to be a Benchmark tool to compare Apples to Oranges. :>) Now the above is a general answer, to do the best you can, my answer would provide a little more detail. :>)

The secondary goal of using OEE to is to drive one to get the most value out of company equipment/facility as one can. To better reach this goal, some of the fortune 500 companies have developed a second benchmarking measurement tool daubed, 'TEEP'.

Please see http://www.downtimecentral.com/oee_teep.htm  for more detail.

If you have the same equipment running different products which each product runs at different speed, you want to use OEE to show you what is your most profitable product. (IE: if equipment is designed to run 30 pieces per minute, and one product requires you to slow equipment to 15 pieces per minute to maintain quality, that product process needs analyzed to improve speed.)

As a side note, maybe after much study, the speed for the slower product could not be improved. Then that lower OEE may be a consideration when pricing that more costly to produce product.

Where TEEP comes into play is that it uses scheduled production time not 24/7.

I noticed you did not mention quality in your original question, but you being Six sigma, I am sure you intended that quality being used in the OEE was assumed. :>)

So in summary, I would recommend both OEE (24/7) for equipment utilization (ROA) and TEEP for weekly benchmark (setting speed factor by product) for operating efficiency.

My Quote "Nobody runs 100% OEE, because nobody is perfect. There is always room for improvement."

Also see OEE analysis for more insight and read "What is the True Downtime Cost (TDC)?" or download the book.

Hope this helps


Human Resource:

What are SOP's, Procedures and Work Instructions?

 Reader Kon S. ask "What are the differences between SOP's, Procedures and Work Instructions?"

Don's Reply:

SOP's are Standard Operating Procedures. Which are procedures (written work instructions) that all follow to give more consistency and control to the process.

Kon elaborates...

"I have seen companies call there documentation work instructions, other companies call them procedures and other companies call them SOP's."

Don further replies ...

I believe I will stick with my first opinion. They are all basically the same and left up to the interpretation of the one's requesting them to be written.

In many cases, "work instructions" may be just a 'How to' with less focus on standardization by the author. A less formal version of the SOP. The use of just the word "procedures" being somewhere in the middle, with "SOP" being the most detailed version with the most focus on standardization.

You will probably find the more formal (and descriptive) terminology "SOP" used more in cases where ISO certification and Corporate guidelines are involved.

Hope this helps

Don

Employee Training and Development with SOP

Employee Training and Development with SOP eBook By Mike Sondalini - Discover how to realize and release the continuous improvement power of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP).


The World Wide Web:

You can pick up the news paper or a trade magazine and read the front page news or cover story of what that establishment feels is a hot topic. The truth is you may get an impression of what is a hot topic in our industry, but in actually, the topic decision was biased, paid for, or just one editor's opinion. 

The internet has some excellent tools for finding out what is truly the hot topic of focus for our industry, and it will be completely unbiased. Take for example Overture's "What's most search for" tool. Below are fairly new topics that are being most searched for by individuals from around the world in our industry. You might find them informative and interesting.

shanghai automotive industry corp

automotive closing general motor plant

industrial air compressor

And it is always interesting to know what topic (relevant to our industry) is the 'most search for' in the basic categories of industrial, engineering and maintenance. This gives you a sense of what relevant topic mater has the most internet presence. (law of supply and demand.)

Overture Google
 36275  industrial supply
 14788  industrial equipment
 11346  telegraph service commercial industrial
 21.2mil  industrial design
 19 mil  industrial engineering
 11346  industrial alliance
23004  engineering services
 21276  civil engineering
 19932  mechanical engineering
22.4 mil  engineering companies
 15 mil  engineering projects
 11.8 mil  engineering council
 14793  maintenance software
 12174  maintenance management
 10479  aircraft maintenance
 21.7 mil  maintenance management
 19.1 mil  maintenance software
 14.2 mil  maintenance manager

Best regards and thanks for being a subscriber to this newsletter,

Don Fitchett
Managing Editor
Feed Forward Publications
http://www.feedforward.com.au
Tel : (573) 547-5630

www.feedforward.com.au teaches your maintenance crew engineering and asset care knowledge so that they can solve more problems, become more knowledgeable, make better decisions and your plant runs more reliably!

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

"The War on Maintenance" newsletter is listed at Mega-Zine (Engineering Ezines)

Maintenance tech tip

Selecting Sprockets for Gearbox Design

Good practice is to always have your smallest sprocket with 19 teeth or more to reduce wear rates (Use odd numbered teeth if possible as it allows the chain to run better over the sprocket).

Mike Sondalini

www.lifetime-reliability.com

 

Automatic Lubricator

This reader having designed an automated lubricator that sprays a constant mist instead of typical drops, has a maintenance tip for us.

Most equipment has an existing plc which this lubrication unit could be interfaced with or a suitable control circuit can be built. This would solve many existing real world obstacles to properly lubricating machinery that use compressed air.

 

The reader highlights some of the major obstacles ...

Lubricators are often behind panels that seldom are opened. Lubricators are seldom "set" to the proper drip rate. It can take over 1/2 hour hour to adjust properly manually due to different machine use, cyclic nature and dwell time. Sometimes the lubricators are filled, turned turned off for various reasons.

 

With automatic lubricators interfaced to PLC, proper control can be obtained quickly, be consistent and PLC can warn plant personnel when not operating properly.

 

Thanks Bruce of www.autolubricator.com

 

Oil and Wear Particle Analysis

 

Both Oil and Wear Particle Analysis have the distinction of being able to detect oncoming problems before any damage occurs. Early warning signs of abnormalities will show up in oil long before the equipment heats up or starts to vibrate.

 

To learn more visit ...

Lubrication-FluidPower.com

 

PLC Discussion Forum

 

I started up a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) Forum. Please stop by and help me out with a post of your own. PLC Discussion Forum

Also please see "PLC Trainer (equipment)"
"On-Line PLC/SCADA Course"

 

Thanks, Don

 

Control System Design and Layout

 

Put a line filter in line with the 110v control voltage for PLCs. To read more control system and layout tips, see our maintenance and engineering articles article area.

 

Reader Feedback
Subject: Downtime related to market and supplier limitations.
Dear sir,

How do you consider equipment downtime due to market limitations in downstream or supplier limitation in upstream?

Sanjeev, Senior Manager - Corporate Quality

__________________

Dear Sanjeev:

Those who read my works know I am a big advocate of asset utilization (bottom line) focus as opposed to those who's primary focus is production schedule (operating efficiency).

With the above in mind, my opinion if market limitation can not be resolved by putting more into sales (product competitiveness and marketing) then capital assets should be adjusted accordingly. Either way reducing downtime due to market limitations.

As for supplier limitations, in most cases, it is possible to obtain zero downtime due to lack of supply. Many lessons can be learned from JIT management who require their suppliers to be JIT also (Like the big three automotive manufacturers).

On a final note, even piece work manufacturers like machining operations should strive for zero downtime on each machine. If you have a machine down because you can not find enough customers to keep production demand up, you have a machine not giving you the full return on the capital investment. (Think diversification, outsourcing and out of the box. :>)


Kudos:

Just a quick feedback on the site... Excellent. Easily navigated and very informative. Covers many of the issues I face in my working life. Had an informative and enjoyable visit. Thanks

Mark (Engineering Manager of a Packaging Plant)

__________________

Thanks for free subscription to such great newsletter. I really was looking for such situation. And I've read the volume 13. It was good.

Sepideh (Senior of Industrial Engineering)

Thank you Mark and Sepideh, your comments inspire us to keep the newsletters going. :>)

Featured Articles :

OEE Analysis at Toyota Motor Manufacturing - Reader Responds

The True Cost of Downtime - By Don Fitchett

The Japanese Path to Maintenance Excellence - By Mike Sondalini


Featured Technical Writings:

Maintenance Control from Zero to Hero

Control System Design and Layout Tips

Equipment maintenance - A second chance


 

World Industry News:

ARCwire for the Week Ending June 10,2005, reaching over 60,000 professionals worldwide.


Archives ...

Up
Vol-14, Lubrication Engineer
Vol 13 - Power Management
Vol-12, Change Management
Vol 10 -Electrical Troubleshooting
Vol-9, PLC Training
Vol-8, Six Sigma
Vol-7, Safety and Reliability
Vol-6 Reliability
Vol-5 Criticality
Vol-4, Human Resources
Vol-3, PLC Programs
Vol-2, managing people
Vol- 1, maintenance advice

Click Newsletter to return to current news letter.

 

Up ] Next ]

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