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Maintenance tech tip
Spray-tower or the packed-tower wet scrubbers?

"We are upgrading the chlorine plants located in the water treatment plants and decided to install an emergency system which will run automatically just in case of a chlorine release; we are wondering if for such an application we should use the spray-tower or the packed-tower wet scrubbers."

Best regards, Manuel Vergara

Process Maintenance Engineer

Mike Sondalini:

Some questions you can ask which will help you make that decision yourself. The decision depends on the chemistry and physics of scrubbing chlorine.

First you need to know the process chemistry that will occur in the scrubber. What liquid will you use to scrub the chlorine out of the gas stream? You need to select a liquid that will remove enough chlorine so that the scrubber only emits a discharge that is below your environmental limits.

The liquid will have specific absorption characteristic with chlorine. You must find out how much chlorine it will absorb and in what time period. Once you know what amounts of chlorine it can remove and how long the chlorine must stay in contact with the liquid before it is absorbed you can decide what sort of scrubber tower is best for your situation.

A packed tower forces the chlorine to stay in close contact with the scrubbing liquid. It also keeps the chlorine and scrubbing liquid together for longer than does a spray tower. With a packed tower you get a lot more control over the absorption of the chlorine into the scrubbing liquid.

The down side of the packed tower is that the packing is another cost and another maintenance issue that a spray tower avoids. It's quite likely that with a packed tower you will need a bigger fan that draws more power than one for a spray tower. On the upside a packed tower should be smaller than a spray tower because the packing keeps the gas steam in contact with the scrubbing liquid more effectively.

One more factor to address is what you will do once the scrubbing stream has fully absorbed the chlorine and it can hold no more - what will you do to refresh scrubbing liquid? Will there be any solids created from components in the gas stream and/or scrubbing liquid coming in contact? How will you remove those?

I hope that you can now work out the best answer that suits your situation.

Best regards,

Mike Sondalini

 

Reader Feedback
Subject: Vibration and Temperature Failures

Hi Don

Thank you for the valuable information you share with all your subscribers. I have just done an analysis on our top failure statistics.32 % of all pump failures in our plant are due to vibration and 23.2% are due to temperature.

I believe that we would reduce our trips by 55% if we address this. Please give me info of the most common cause of vibration and temperature failures.

Once again thank you for your fantastic information service.

Best regards

Farouk.

 

DON: 

Thank you Farouk, for the kind words. While this month we will be forwarding your question to reliability experts, we would also ask our readers to send in their experiences.

 

So please "readers" of this newsletter, contact us with your most common causes of vibration and temperature failures.

 

Thanks in advance. :>)


Subject: Reliability Centered Maintenance 

I wish to learn more on Best maintenance practices in today's pulp industry. Please try to provide me info on this subject. Also I would like to train our Maintenance team on RCM. I like to see your articles and training help. Regards

DON:

Mike Sondalini wrote the featured article just for you. :>)

 

Human Resource:

You may not be hearing your machine operators, but this is what many are saying.

Please read the operator's feedback below and take measures today to insure you are not wasting your human resources.

"As a machine operator in a factory I am told at every employee meeting that our labor cost and down time are eating up all of my companies profits. Yet when my machine breaks down five to six managers run over and look at the broken machine, devise several different scenarios as to how I could have prevented the breakdown and then call one repair man over to fix my machine and leave. How would I calculate their labor cost as they did nothing to repair or prevent the machine from breaking again?"

DON: There is no doubt many companies have this same manpower waste as described above. If 5 supervisors arrived, the  unnecessary cost will be a minimum of ...

(total time 4 supervisors was on the scene X 4) X (supervisor's salary/hours worked per year)

Companies allowing the "just putting out fires" method of management usually have much greater hidden cost. To get an idea, please see ...

www.downtimecentral.com/Labor.htm

Featured Article :

Reliability Centered Maintenance
By Mike Sondalini


World Industry News:

January 12, 2004

Business Industrial Network has teamed up with Industrial Training Inc. to bring you the most value added PLC training seminar offer. 

Troubleshooting PLC 5® and SLC 500® with Allen-Bradley RSLogix®

I (Don) will be conducting this seminar in Georgia, USA. So if you can make it, I look forward to meeting you all. :>)


ARCwire for the Week Ending November 30,2003, reaching over 60,000 professionals worldwide.


Archives ...

Up
Vol-14, Lubrication Engineer
Vol 13 - Power Management
Vol-12, Change Management
Vol 10 -Electrical Troubleshooting
Vol-9, PLC Training
Vol-8, Six Sigma
Vol-7, Safety and Reliability
Vol-6 Reliability
Vol-5 Criticality
Vol-4, Human Resources
Vol-3, PLC Programs
Vol-2, managing people
Vol- 1, maintenance advice

Click Newsletter to return to current news letter.

 

Volume 6:

Welcome: 

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

RE: Reliability

This month at several reader's request, we focus on reliability. We wanted to get you something new on reliability, not just well known information repackaged. :>)

Hi everyone, and welcome to December's issue of our Feed Forward Newsletter! My name is Don Fitchett, the author of "The Maintenance War Newsletter". This first area of the newsletter is for introductions and commentary. I would like to wish you all a happy and safe Holiday.

If you are reading this newsletter after someone forward you a copy, you can find an online version on the our website www.feedforward.com.au We have added some new book titles for you to download and new free articles too.

Mike Sondalini has written us an article with a  fresh perspective on Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). (For those who do not already know, Mike was the original founder of Feed Forward Publications and this newsletter!)

Also of great interest to our readers will be Mike Sondalini's article he is currently collaborating on for January's newsletter. Don't tell any one (:>), but it's a totally new presentation of how maintenance and reliability combine to deliver availability.

Author Ian SuttonWe also have two new books to offer by author Ian Sutton. Mr. Sutton has 15 years of experience in industrial risk analysis, and has extensive operating procedures experience.

The two new books by Ian Sutton added this month are ...

Process Hazards Analysis - This book describes in detail how to run a Process Hazards Analysis, and how to effectively identify hazards.

Process Safety Audit Protocols - This collection of audit questions and guidelines that  addresses the requirements of OSHA's Process Safety Management standard (29 CFR 1910.119) and the EPA's Risk Management Program Regulation Title 40 Part 68.


Management Help:

Reliability and Availability

This months tidbit of management help is in the form of advice in response to a reader's inquiry. Of course we have removed the name and company to protect the innocent. :>) Our reader ask ...

Hi Don

Our utility company has set targets of

Maintenance staff utilization - 90%

Electric pumping plant reliability - 40 days

Electric Plant Availability - 90%

We believe that these targets are high and may be unrealistic. Our organization management measure our performance based on the aforementioned targets. We have not met the set targets for the last 3 months. Don ,do you know if other similar utilities have similar performance measurements? And do you think our planned targets are realistic and achievable?

DON: 

The numbers you now have are great in my opinion. The goal for a utility company is not unrealistic, in my opinion. The very important factor is how does management arrive at those numbers and is that calculation method realistic. All and all, using what ever method they are and as long as management is consistent in the measurement method, you can use the numbers as bench mark.

You should be able to show constant improvement so the numbers should go up, even if only a fraction of a percentage. If management’s method of calculating those numbers is flawed, that may be all you can obtain is fractions of a percent increase. The best advice is to bring in an outside consultant to analyze the measurement method, followed by a RCM report. Coincidently, RCM is the topic of this month’s newsletter and Mike Sondalini has written a great article on Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM).

There are two basic types of management methodologies...

1. Set unrealistic goals and crack the whip to get your people to strive towards them.

2. Set realistic constant improvement goals and motivate your people to reach higher numbers each time frame.

Most managers now days, have realized the motivational technique is much more profitable. But there are the old school types too. I hope this month's newsletter will help you make an increase in your numbers.

Thanks


The World Wide Web:

What's new in the reliability world?

Writing the Perfect PM - by Ralph Hackle

From developing a PM template with example PM template to using RCM tools to determine the frequency of each PM.

The Fate of Proaction When Economic Downturn Occurs
Robert J. Latino, Reliability Center, Inc., Oct. 2003

Reader requested "continuous vibration monitoring" links...

The new ME9601 system, early warning of excessive vibration levels

 

Power Plant Primer Vibration Monitoring - automationtechies.com

A New Generation of Condition Monitoring And Diagnostic Systems - An excellent article at vibrotek.com


A Good Laugh!

Sent in by our reader, thanks Mikie!

The Harley Davidson Joke was offensive to some and we had to remove it. We apologize for the error in judgment.

:>)


Best regards and thanks for being a subscriber to this newsletter,

Don Fitchett
Managing Editor
Feed Forward Publications
http://www.feedforward.com.au
Tel : (573) 547-5630

www.feedforward.com.au teaches your maintenance crew engineering and asset care knowledge so that they can solve more problems, become more knowledgeable, make better decisions and your plant runs more reliably!

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

Volume 6:

Welcome: 

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

RE: Reliability

This month at several reader's request, we focus on reliability. We wanted to get you something new on reliability, not just well known information repackaged. :>)

Hi everyone, and welcome to December's issue of our Feed Forward Newsletter! My name is Don Fitchett, the author of "The Maintenance War Newsletter". This first area of the newsletter is for introductions and commentary. I would like to wish you all a happy and safe Holiday.

If you are reading this newsletter after someone forward you a copy, you can find an online version on the our website www.feedforward.com.au We have added some new book titles for you to download and new free articles too.

Mike Sondalini has written us an article with a  fresh perspective on Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). (For those who do not already know, Mike was the original founder of Feed Forward Publications and this newsletter!)

Also of great interest to our readers will be Mike Sondalini's article he is currently collaborating on for January's newsletter. Don't tell any one (:>), but it's a totally new presentation of how maintenance and reliability combine to deliver availability.

Author Ian SuttonWe also have two new books to offer by author Ian Sutton. Mr. Sutton has 15 years of experience in industrial risk analysis, and has extensive operating procedures experience.

The two new books by Ian Sutton added this month are ...

Process Hazards Analysis - This book describes in detail how to run a Process Hazards Analysis, and how to effectively identify hazards.

Process Safety Audit Protocols - This collection of audit questions and guidelines that  addresses the requirements of OSHA's Process Safety Management standard (29 CFR 1910.119) and the EPA's Risk Management Program Regulation Title 40 Part 68.


Management Help:

Reliability and Availability

This months tidbit of management help is in the form of advice in response to a reader's inquiry. Of course we have removed the name and company to protect the innocent. :>) Our reader ask ...

Hi Don

Our utility company has set targets of

Maintenance staff utilization - 90%

Electric pumping plant reliability - 40 days

Electric Plant Availability - 90%

We believe that these targets are high and may be unrealistic. Our organization management measure our performance based on the aforementioned targets. We have not met the set targets for the last 3 months. Don ,do you know if other similar utilities have similar performance measurements? And do you think our planned targets are realistic and achievable?

DON: 

The numbers you now have are great in my opinion. The goal for a utility company is not unrealistic, in my opinion. The very important factor is how does management arrive at those numbers and is that calculation method realistic. All and all, using what ever method they are and as long as management is consistent in the measurement method, you can use the numbers as bench mark.

You should be able to show constant improvement so the numbers should go up, even if only a fraction of a percentage. If management’s method of calculating those numbers is flawed, that may be all you can obtain is fractions of a percent increase. The best advice is to bring in an outside consultant to analyze the measurement method, followed by a RCM report. Coincidently, RCM is the topic of this month’s newsletter and Mike Sondalini has written a great article on Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM).

There are two basic types of management methodologies...

1. Set unrealistic goals and crack the whip to get your people to strive towards them.

2. Set realistic constant improvement goals and motivate your people to reach higher numbers each time frame.

Most managers now days, have realized the motivational technique is much more profitable. But there are the old school types too. I hope this month's newsletter will help you make an increase in your numbers.

Thanks


The World Wide Web:

What's new in the reliability world?

Writing the Perfect PM - by Ralph Hackle

From developing a PM template with example PM template to using RCM tools to determine the frequency of each PM.

The Fate of Proaction When Economic Downturn Occurs
Robert J. Latino, Reliability Center, Inc., Oct. 2003

Reader requested "continuous vibration monitoring" links...

The new ME9601 system, early warning of excessive vibration levels

 

Power Plant Primer Vibration Monitoring - automationtechies.com

A New Generation of Condition Monitoring And Diagnostic Systems - An excellent article at vibrotek.com


A Good Laugh!

Sent in by our reader, thanks Mikie!

The Harley Davidson Joke was offensive to some and we had to remove it. We apologize for the error in judgment.

:>)


Best regards and thanks for being a subscriber to this newsletter,

Don Fitchett
Managing Editor
Feed Forward Publications
http://www.feedforward.com.au
Tel : (573) 547-5630

www.feedforward.com.au teaches your maintenance crew engineering and asset care knowledge so that they can solve more problems, become more knowledgeable, make better decisions and your plant runs more reliably!

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

Maintenance tech tip
Spray-tower or the packed-tower wet scrubbers?

"We are upgrading the chlorine plants located in the water treatment plants and decided to install an emergency system which will run automatically just in case of a chlorine release; we are wondering if for such an application we should use the spray-tower or the packed-tower wet scrubbers."

Best regards, Manuel Vergara

Process Maintenance Engineer

Mike Sondalini:

Some questions you can ask which will help you make that decision yourself. The decision depends on the chemistry and physics of scrubbing chlorine.

First you need to know the process chemistry that will occur in the scrubber. What liquid will you use to scrub the chlorine out of the gas stream? You need to select a liquid that will remove enough chlorine so that the scrubber only emits a discharge that is below your environmental limits.

The liquid will have specific absorption characteristic with chlorine. You must find out how much chlorine it will absorb and in what time period. Once you know what amounts of chlorine it can remove and how long the chlorine must stay in contact with the liquid before it is absorbed you can decide what sort of scrubber tower is best for your situation.

A packed tower forces the chlorine to stay in close contact with the scrubbing liquid. It also keeps the chlorine and scrubbing liquid together for longer than does a spray tower. With a packed tower you get a lot more control over the absorption of the chlorine into the scrubbing liquid.

The down side of the packed tower is that the packing is another cost and another maintenance issue that a spray tower avoids. It's quite likely that with a packed tower you will need a bigger fan that draws more power than one for a spray tower. On the upside a packed tower should be smaller than a spray tower because the packing keeps the gas steam in contact with the scrubbing liquid more effectively.

One more factor to address is what you will do once the scrubbing stream has fully absorbed the chlorine and it can hold no more - what will you do to refresh scrubbing liquid? Will there be any solids created from components in the gas stream and/or scrubbing liquid coming in contact? How will you remove those?

I hope that you can now work out the best answer that suits your situation.

Best regards,

Mike Sondalini

 

Reader Feedback
Subject: Vibration and Temperature Failures

Hi Don

Thank you for the valuable information you share with all your subscribers. I have just done an analysis on our top failure statistics.32 % of all pump failures in our plant are due to vibration and 23.2% are due to temperature.

I believe that we would reduce our trips by 55% if we address this. Please give me info of the most common cause of vibration and temperature failures.

Once again thank you for your fantastic information service.

Best regards

Farouk.

 

DON: 

Thank you Farouk, for the kind words. While this month we will be forwarding your question to reliability experts, we would also ask our readers to send in their experiences.

 

So please "readers" of this newsletter, contact us with your most common causes of vibration and temperature failures.

 

Thanks in advance. :>)


Subject: Reliability Centered Maintenance 

I wish to learn more on Best maintenance practices in today's pulp industry. Please try to provide me info on this subject. Also I would like to train our Maintenance team on RCM. I like to see your articles and training help. Regards

DON:

Mike Sondalini wrote the featured article just for you. :>)

 

Human Resource:

You may not be hearing your machine operators, but this is what many are saying.

Please read the operator's feedback below and take measures today to insure you are not wasting your human resources.

"As a machine operator in a factory I am told at every employee meeting that our labor cost and down time are eating up all of my companies profits. Yet when my machine breaks down five to six managers run over and look at the broken machine, devise several different scenarios as to how I could have prevented the breakdown and then call one repair man over to fix my machine and leave. How would I calculate their labor cost as they did nothing to repair or prevent the machine from breaking again?"

DON: There is no doubt many companies have this same manpower waste as described above. If 5 supervisors arrived, the  unnecessary cost will be a minimum of ...

(total time 4 supervisors was on the scene X 4) X (supervisor's salary/hours worked per year)

Companies allowing the "just putting out fires" method of management usually have much greater hidden cost. To get an idea, please see ...

www.downtimecentral.com/Labor.htm

Featured Article :

Reliability Centered Maintenance
By Mike Sondalini


World Industry News:

January 12, 2004

Business Industrial Network has teamed up with Industrial Training Inc. to bring you the most value added PLC training seminar offer. 

Troubleshooting PLC 5® and SLC 500® with Allen-Bradley RSLogix®

I (Don) will be conducting this seminar in Georgia, USA. So if you can make it, I look forward to meeting you all. :>)


ARCwire for the Week Ending November 30,2003, reaching over 60,000 professionals worldwide.


Archives ...

Up
Vol-14, Lubrication Engineer
Vol 13 - Power Management
Vol-12, Change Management
Vol 10 -Electrical Troubleshooting
Vol-9, PLC Training
Vol-8, Six Sigma
Vol-7, Safety and Reliability
Vol-6 Reliability
Vol-5 Criticality
Vol-4, Human Resources
Vol-3, PLC Programs
Vol-2, managing people
Vol- 1, maintenance advice

Click Newsletter to return to current news letter.

 

Viewers understands that any content or other information offered on or through FeedForward.com.au is provided for informational purposes only. Viewers should evaluate any content or other information offered on or through FeedForward.com.au in light of viewer's own individual circumstances. © 2016 Feed Forward - A subsidiary of Business Industrial Network