free email newsletter - the maintenance war.

free email newsletter


Maintenance tech tip
Writing the Perfect PM

The first step to developing the perfect PM is to develop a template.  This template should be built on a logical sequential order.  It must be worded clearly and concisely and it should contain these points and probably more. 

      A contact person for the area of work.  Communications are essential.

      Each step needs to have some form of a check off such as a ___ or o.

      Safety consideration well documented such as lock out/ tag out procedures or equipment specific safety precautions.

      A listed of all needed parts and special tools.

      When using the word check or inspect, be clear as to what needs to be looked at and if needed what to do when found.

o        Example: Inspect shaft for signs of wear such as cracks or discoloration.  If found note on inspection sheet.

o        Example: Check meter.  Meter should read between 25-40.  If out of range either way note on check sheet and immediately inform shift supervisor.

      Task sheets need to be written for the specific skill level doing the work.

      Task sheets need to be written as if  employees are new to the facility.

      Task should have a specific crew size and hours.

      When working on multiple levels or equipment, a flow to the work should be laid out.

      If certain specifications are always needed when performing the task, they need to be included.

      If OEM manuals or prints may be needed for reference, always give their locations and keeper.

      A sign off at the bottom of the task sheet that shows it was completed should be included.

      Periodically, give out a task planning survey sheet when doing the task.  This feedback will be invaluable to the planner and gives the workman say in design.

Click for Example ...

Preventive Maintenance Template

 

Or click on ...

Preventive Maintenance Software

 

This is an excerpt from "The perfect  PM" by Ralph Hackle President of Industrial Training Inc.

(www.IndustrialTrainingInc.com)

 

Reader Feedback
Subject: Interesting Engineering

I often wondered how they loaded the Cole on that Norwegian transporter. Quite an innovative engineering solution!

Mikie


Subject:  Pump Failures

In response to your request to help out the reader, Farouk, with his question on pumps, here's the main causes we have identified for these types of failures:

1. Misalignment between the pump and the driver.  We use a laser alignment tool on all direct coupled pumps and ignore the OEMs maximum permitted misalignment figures and aim to get the smallest misalignment possible (well below the OEM recommendation)

2. Loose or broken foundation bolts.  If the frame's not held down tight - you're going to get vibration.

3. Non-rigid mounting frames.  In an effort to be competitive, OEMS make the frame as light as possible.  Often a few stiffening ribs, or filling the frame with grout will help things along.

4. Transferred loads between the outlet piping and the pump.  Pipe-work misalignment can put a load onto the pump, leading to vibration.  Always use a flexible joint between the pump and the pipe-work.

5. Bearing high temp is often caused by over-greasing.  We have had several cases where a bearing temp goes high so the first response is to add more grease.  If it's not leaking out, you don't need to put more in.

The main thing to remember in these cases is the laws of physics.  Vibration is a measure of acceleration and F=Ma.  Therefore, start looking for the force that is causing the problem.

Hope this is helpful.

Steve Quilter
Callide Power Station

Featured Articles :

EDR - Engineering Driven Reliability By Mike Sondalini

Total Performance Safety 
By Randy DeVaul

Condition Monitoring Reliability Charts by Mike Sondalini and Max Wishaw 


World Industry News:

January 12, 2004

Business Industrial Network has teamed up with Industrial Training Inc. to bring you the most value added PLC training seminar offer. 

Troubleshooting PLC 5 and SLC 500 with Allen-Bradley RSLogix

I (Don) will be conducting this seminar in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. So if you can make it, I look forward to meeting you all. :>)


ARCwire for the Week Ending January 06,2004, reaching over 60,000 professionals worldwide.


Archives ...

Up
Vol-14, Lubrication Engineer
Vol 13 - Power Management
Vol-12, Change Management
Vol 10 -Electrical Troubleshooting
Vol-9, PLC Training
Vol-8, Six Sigma
Vol-7, Safety and Reliability
Vol-6 Reliability
Vol-5 Criticality
Vol-4, Human Resources
Vol-3, PLC Programs
Vol-2, managing people
Vol- 1, maintenance advice

Click Newsletter to return to current news letter.

 

January 2004:

Welcome: 

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

RE: Have a Safe New Year

With the first issue of our newsletter for this year we are pleased to deliver valuable information new to the industry. As you share this information with your associates, be sure and let them know www.feedforward.com.au was the first to release it!

Happy New Years, and welcome to January's issue of our Feed Forward Newsletter! My name is Don Fitchett, the author of "The Maintenance War Newsletter". This first area of the newsletter is for introductions and commentary. I would like to start by wishing you all a productive and safe new year.

If a friend has given you this copy of the newsletter, you can find an online version on our website www.feedforward.com.au Every month we add new book titles for you to download, free articles and other resources.

In the spirit of the common greeting used world wide; 'Have a safe new year', we present to you this month a new Safety book before it hits the book stands and a new concept that is sure to revolutionize the reliability industry. I hope this month's newsletter helps you fulfill a new year's resolution of constant improvement in both safety and reliability.

Mike Sondalini has favored us by letting Feed Forward Publications be the first to release his new article and concept. With his article 'The One Absolutely Critical Point RCM, FMEA and the like  All Miss!', Mike is introducing the next evolution in reliability. After 300 years, it is time for Engineering Driven Reliability (EDR)!

Last month we promised you Mike Sondalini's totally new presentation of how maintenance and reliability combine to deliver availability. This is a collaborative article by Mike and retired vibration analysis expert  Max Wishaw. Max uses charts to keep it simple while delivering a clear picture of the relationships.

We are also thankful to author Randy DeVaul of (www.goldenplume.com) for letting us publish his new book, 'Performance Safety: Lessons For Life' and for the great article 'Total Performance Safety Real World Safety in the Real World' he donated for our readers. Randy's contributions will surely lead to a safer new year for us all.

Also this month, watch our website for a new revision to Mike Sondalini's Ebook 'Belt Bucket Elevator Design, Use and Care' It has been in the top 5 seller list since it's release. The revised Ebook is titled 'Belt Bucket Elevator Design, Use and Care - Second Edition'. 

The Second Edition gives greater detail on bearing selection, shaft dust sealing, belt tensioning, dust extraction, belt and bucket selection, hazardous applications and a lot more on proper use and care. Mike has indicated there is more focus on a buyer's perspective to help in selecting equipment for purchase.


Management Help:

Performance Safety - What is it?

Performance Safety re-focuses attention back to the basic fundamentals. It is defined as an on-going review of processes, procedures, and individual/team practices through three basic methods: workplace examinations, observation, and task analysis. It provides a pro-active, continuous improvement environment to encourage safe production at all levels.

Performance Safety recognizes individual and team performance in pro-active (not reactive) injury prevention techniques that will totally prevent, or at least, reduce exposures to hazards. It allows employees at every level to achieve optimum performance by:

  •  Recognizing and correcting any unsafe condition or practice  individually and as a team.
  •  Identifying/implementing more efficient, safer ways to perform  a task.
  •  Improving/streamlining processes to adjust for newly-identified  hazards.
  •  Modifying/enhancing Safe Operating Instructions to ensure  consistent and repeated safe instruction and performance of  the task(s)

Performance Safety involves all aspects of a person and companys performance, so defining an unsafe condition and unsafe act are based on performance issues.

Unsafe Condition: exists if an individual does not have either knowledge or control over existing circumstances that may be unsafe, that would otherwise suggest he would not perform the action.

Unsafe Act: an action taken by an individual who has both knowledge and control of an existing unsafe condition or action, but chooses to perform the action or ignore the condition.

The above definitions account for behaviors, corporate culture, and expectations.

An employee that has not been trained properly may not know how to do the task properly, resulting in an unsafe condition. He is not choosing to do it with risk, so it is not an unsafe action being performed. An employee that knows how to perform the task but circumstances take the control away would also be an unsafe condition. For example, while welding, an employee must bend at the waist to reach the work area. There is no mechanism available to allow him to reach it from a different angle. As a result, the employee experiences back pain while performing his duties. He had no control over the location of the work and was unable to modify the duty to protect his back. This is an unsafe condition.

An employee knows how to properly perform a task and has been trained specifically in this task, yet he insists on modifying the procedure to save time. He has full control in the decision to perform the task and has all the appropriate tools and equipment to complete the task safely. An example is choosing not to wear leathers to weld and, as a result, the employee catches his clothing on fire. This is clearly an unsafe act. The process is clear, the procedure is clear, the practice (behavior) is at-risk.

Performance Safety, then, takes into account the practices (employee choices), the procedures (identified way the task should be performed, if identified correctly), and the overall process (employee training, employee expectations established through corporate culture and management, etc).

This month's management section written by Randy DeVaul of (www.goldenplume.com) author of 'Performance Safety: Lessons For Life'


Human Resource:

This month's newsletter is sponsored by the Institute for International Research in Australia. www.iir.com.au 

Click here for a copy of the brochure for the Seminar/Workshop on 

"Planning and Managing Shutdowns and Turnarounds"  

Date: 29 - 30 March 2004
Venue: Novotel, Brisbane


 

The World Wide Web:

Have a Safe New Year:

How about 254 Safety related free power point downloads and over 140,000 msds files as just a couple of the many great resources you can find at siri.uvm.edu

Another great source while improving your plant safety is the OSHWEB, a directory of safety related internet resources.

For Reference: The Office of Hazardous Materials Safety http://hazmat.dot.gov/
Within the United States Department of Transportation's Research and Special Programs Administration, and responsible for coordinating a national safety program for the transportation of hazardous materials by air, rail, highway and water.


A Good Laugh!

Well this month's bit of entertainment is a question that  the answer may make you laugh, you may think it is cool, or you may just get up set. :>) I have quizzed my friends for more years than I can remember and no one has figured it out. So I will give you a clue, it is a play on words. (The first one to get it right will receive a prize!)

You are placed in a room (a cube with 6 sides), made of steel. There are no doors or windows, all that is in the room with you is a mirror and a table. How do you get out?

Next month we will give you the answer.


Best regards and thanks for being a subscriber to this newsletter,

Don Fitchett
Managing Editor
Feed Forward Publications
http://www.feedforward.com.au
Tel : (573) 547-5630

www.feedforward.com.au teaches your maintenance crew engineering and asset care knowledge so that they can solve more problems, become more knowledgeable, make better decisions and your plant runs more reliably!

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

January 2004:

Welcome: 

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

RE: Have a Safe New Year

With the first issue of our newsletter for this year we are pleased to deliver valuable information new to the industry. As you share this information with your associates, be sure and let them know www.feedforward.com.au was the first to release it!

Happy New Years, and welcome to January's issue of our Feed Forward Newsletter! My name is Don Fitchett, the author of "The Maintenance War Newsletter". This first area of the newsletter is for introductions and commentary. I would like to start by wishing you all a productive and safe new year.

If a friend has given you this copy of the newsletter, you can find an online version on our website www.feedforward.com.au Every month we add new book titles for you to download, free articles and other resources.

In the spirit of the common greeting used world wide; 'Have a safe new year', we present to you this month a new Safety book before it hits the book stands and a new concept that is sure to revolutionize the reliability industry. I hope this month's newsletter helps you fulfill a new year's resolution of constant improvement in both safety and reliability.

Mike Sondalini has favored us by letting Feed Forward Publications be the first to release his new article and concept. With his article 'The One Absolutely Critical Point RCM, FMEA and the like  All Miss!', Mike is introducing the next evolution in reliability. After 300 years, it is time for Engineering Driven Reliability (EDR)!

Last month we promised you Mike Sondalini's totally new presentation of how maintenance and reliability combine to deliver availability. This is a collaborative article by Mike and retired vibration analysis expert  Max Wishaw. Max uses charts to keep it simple while delivering a clear picture of the relationships.

We are also thankful to author Randy DeVaul of (www.goldenplume.com) for letting us publish his new book, 'Performance Safety: Lessons For Life' and for the great article 'Total Performance Safety Real World Safety in the Real World' he donated for our readers. Randy's contributions will surely lead to a safer new year for us all.

Also this month, watch our website for a new revision to Mike Sondalini's Ebook 'Belt Bucket Elevator Design, Use and Care' It has been in the top 5 seller list since it's release. The revised Ebook is titled 'Belt Bucket Elevator Design, Use and Care - Second Edition'. 

The Second Edition gives greater detail on bearing selection, shaft dust sealing, belt tensioning, dust extraction, belt and bucket selection, hazardous applications and a lot more on proper use and care. Mike has indicated there is more focus on a buyer's perspective to help in selecting equipment for purchase.


Management Help:

Performance Safety - What is it?

Performance Safety re-focuses attention back to the basic fundamentals. It is defined as an on-going review of processes, procedures, and individual/team practices through three basic methods: workplace examinations, observation, and task analysis. It provides a pro-active, continuous improvement environment to encourage safe production at all levels.

Performance Safety recognizes individual and team performance in pro-active (not reactive) injury prevention techniques that will totally prevent, or at least, reduce exposures to hazards. It allows employees at every level to achieve optimum performance by:

  •  Recognizing and correcting any unsafe condition or practice  individually and as a team.
  •  Identifying/implementing more efficient, safer ways to perform  a task.
  •  Improving/streamlining processes to adjust for newly-identified  hazards.
  •  Modifying/enhancing Safe Operating Instructions to ensure  consistent and repeated safe instruction and performance of  the task(s)

Performance Safety involves all aspects of a person and companys performance, so defining an unsafe condition and unsafe act are based on performance issues.

Unsafe Condition: exists if an individual does not have either knowledge or control over existing circumstances that may be unsafe, that would otherwise suggest he would not perform the action.

Unsafe Act: an action taken by an individual who has both knowledge and control of an existing unsafe condition or action, but chooses to perform the action or ignore the condition.

The above definitions account for behaviors, corporate culture, and expectations.

An employee that has not been trained properly may not know how to do the task properly, resulting in an unsafe condition. He is not choosing to do it with risk, so it is not an unsafe action being performed. An employee that knows how to perform the task but circumstances take the control away would also be an unsafe condition. For example, while welding, an employee must bend at the waist to reach the work area. There is no mechanism available to allow him to reach it from a different angle. As a result, the employee experiences back pain while performing his duties. He had no control over the location of the work and was unable to modify the duty to protect his back. This is an unsafe condition.

An employee knows how to properly perform a task and has been trained specifically in this task, yet he insists on modifying the procedure to save time. He has full control in the decision to perform the task and has all the appropriate tools and equipment to complete the task safely. An example is choosing not to wear leathers to weld and, as a result, the employee catches his clothing on fire. This is clearly an unsafe act. The process is clear, the procedure is clear, the practice (behavior) is at-risk.

Performance Safety, then, takes into account the practices (employee choices), the procedures (identified way the task should be performed, if identified correctly), and the overall process (employee training, employee expectations established through corporate culture and management, etc).

This month's management section written by Randy DeVaul of (www.goldenplume.com) author of 'Performance Safety: Lessons For Life'


Human Resource:

This month's newsletter is sponsored by the Institute for International Research in Australia. www.iir.com.au 

Click here for a copy of the brochure for the Seminar/Workshop on 

"Planning and Managing Shutdowns and Turnarounds"  

Date: 29 - 30 March 2004
Venue: Novotel, Brisbane


 

The World Wide Web:

Have a Safe New Year:

How about 254 Safety related free power point downloads and over 140,000 msds files as just a couple of the many great resources you can find at siri.uvm.edu

Another great source while improving your plant safety is the OSHWEB, a directory of safety related internet resources.

For Reference: The Office of Hazardous Materials Safety http://hazmat.dot.gov/
Within the United States Department of Transportation's Research and Special Programs Administration, and responsible for coordinating a national safety program for the transportation of hazardous materials by air, rail, highway and water.


A Good Laugh!

Well this month's bit of entertainment is a question that  the answer may make you laugh, you may think it is cool, or you may just get up set. :>) I have quizzed my friends for more years than I can remember and no one has figured it out. So I will give you a clue, it is a play on words. (The first one to get it right will receive a prize!)

You are placed in a room (a cube with 6 sides), made of steel. There are no doors or windows, all that is in the room with you is a mirror and a table. How do you get out?

Next month we will give you the answer.


Best regards and thanks for being a subscriber to this newsletter,

Don Fitchett
Managing Editor
Feed Forward Publications
http://www.feedforward.com.au
Tel : (573) 547-5630

www.feedforward.com.au teaches your maintenance crew engineering and asset care knowledge so that they can solve more problems, become more knowledgeable, make better decisions and your plant runs more reliably!

Please select "subscribe to newsletter" on our contact form.

Maintenance tech tip
Writing the Perfect PM

The first step to developing the perfect PM is to develop a template.  This template should be built on a logical sequential order.  It must be worded clearly and concisely and it should contain these points and probably more. 

      A contact person for the area of work.  Communications are essential.

      Each step needs to have some form of a check off such as a ___ or o.

      Safety consideration well documented such as lock out/ tag out procedures or equipment specific safety precautions.

      A listed of all needed parts and special tools.

      When using the word check or inspect, be clear as to what needs to be looked at and if needed what to do when found.

o        Example: Inspect shaft for signs of wear such as cracks or discoloration.  If found note on inspection sheet.

o        Example: Check meter.  Meter should read between 25-40.  If out of range either way note on check sheet and immediately inform shift supervisor.

      Task sheets need to be written for the specific skill level doing the work.

      Task sheets need to be written as if  employees are new to the facility.

      Task should have a specific crew size and hours.

      When working on multiple levels or equipment, a flow to the work should be laid out.

      If certain specifications are always needed when performing the task, they need to be included.

      If OEM manuals or prints may be needed for reference, always give their locations and keeper.

      A sign off at the bottom of the task sheet that shows it was completed should be included.

      Periodically, give out a task planning survey sheet when doing the task.  This feedback will be invaluable to the planner and gives the workman say in design.

Click for Example ...

Preventive Maintenance Template

 

Or click on ...

Preventive Maintenance Software

 

This is an excerpt from "The perfect  PM" by Ralph Hackle President of Industrial Training Inc.

(www.IndustrialTrainingInc.com)

 

Reader Feedback
Subject: Interesting Engineering

I often wondered how they loaded the Cole on that Norwegian transporter. Quite an innovative engineering solution!

Mikie


Subject:  Pump Failures

In response to your request to help out the reader, Farouk, with his question on pumps, here's the main causes we have identified for these types of failures:

1. Misalignment between the pump and the driver.  We use a laser alignment tool on all direct coupled pumps and ignore the OEMs maximum permitted misalignment figures and aim to get the smallest misalignment possible (well below the OEM recommendation)

2. Loose or broken foundation bolts.  If the frame's not held down tight - you're going to get vibration.

3. Non-rigid mounting frames.  In an effort to be competitive, OEMS make the frame as light as possible.  Often a few stiffening ribs, or filling the frame with grout will help things along.

4. Transferred loads between the outlet piping and the pump.  Pipe-work misalignment can put a load onto the pump, leading to vibration.  Always use a flexible joint between the pump and the pipe-work.

5. Bearing high temp is often caused by over-greasing.  We have had several cases where a bearing temp goes high so the first response is to add more grease.  If it's not leaking out, you don't need to put more in.

The main thing to remember in these cases is the laws of physics.  Vibration is a measure of acceleration and F=Ma.  Therefore, start looking for the force that is causing the problem.

Hope this is helpful.

Steve Quilter
Callide Power Station

Featured Articles :

EDR - Engineering Driven Reliability By Mike Sondalini

Total Performance Safety 
By Randy DeVaul

Condition Monitoring Reliability Charts by Mike Sondalini and Max Wishaw 


World Industry News:

January 12, 2004

Business Industrial Network has teamed up with Industrial Training Inc. to bring you the most value added PLC training seminar offer. 

Troubleshooting PLC 5 and SLC 500 with Allen-Bradley RSLogix

I (Don) will be conducting this seminar in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. So if you can make it, I look forward to meeting you all. :>)


ARCwire for the Week Ending January 06,2004, reaching over 60,000 professionals worldwide.


Archives ...

Up
Vol-14, Lubrication Engineer
Vol 13 - Power Management
Vol-12, Change Management
Vol 10 -Electrical Troubleshooting
Vol-9, PLC Training
Vol-8, Six Sigma
Vol-7, Safety and Reliability
Vol-6 Reliability
Vol-5 Criticality
Vol-4, Human Resources
Vol-3, PLC Programs
Vol-2, managing people
Vol- 1, maintenance advice

Click Newsletter to return to current news letter.

 

Viewers understands that any content or other information offered on or through FeedForward.com.au is provided for informational purposes only. Viewers should evaluate any content or other information offered on or through FeedForward.com.au in light of viewer's own individual circumstances. © 2016 Feed Forward - A subsidiary of Business Industrial Network